Alvin Marshall

Alvin Marshall

Sculptor – Native American Figurative

Raspberry Utah Alabaster

27″H x 10.5″W x 8.5″D

 

 

 

 

 

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The inspiration for “Birth of the Millennial” is Alvin’s youngest son born in the time of Millennials around the 1980s. The mother cradles their son in her arms. Her loving affection shines upon him. The two angelic beings behind them are divided as male and female–two spirits one heart. On the left, the female spirit with rounded face watches over them and looks up toward the future and other children. The male spirit protects them and looks down and to their future.

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Utah Alabaster

 

21″H x 7″W x 6″D

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This eagle is flying to the Pleiades, in Navajo this is called Di`-lya. Etched on the backside is the view from the Pleiades, looking back toward earth.

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Utah Alabaster

25″H x 14″W x 13″D

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This piece signifies the beauty within ourselves, that which we often do not identify within ourselves. We fail to see our own inner beauty. This piece challenges us to look for the hidden beauty within Mother Nature. Can you identify the hidden faces within this sculpture with the primary depiction of Mother Eagle feeding her young? Hidden features include: Deer, Wolf, Bear and Mountain Lion.

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When Navajo sculptor Alvin Marshall holds a piece of Utah alabaster in his hands, he isn’t just touching a rock. He’s communing with his ancestors and working to turn the stone into spirit. “My people use stone in traditional ceremonies. Alabaster is closely associated with water and water ceremonies,” says Alvin, who lives near Farmington, New Mexico. “It’s beautiful, forgiving and it lends itself to me easily. It doesn’t fight or argue. Together, we make a spirit.”

After a stint with the U.S. Army, Alvin studied sculpture with renowned Navajo artist Oreland Joe in the early 1980s. Though he received no formal training, Alvin rejects the idea of being self-taught. “Nobody is self-taught,” he says. “I learned from other artists, from teachers and from friends, and from my travels.” In fact, before Alvin traveled to Italy, he says he had a dream where Michelangelo told him to appreciate European art but seek out Alvin’s own niche. Partly because of that profound revelation, the models for Alvin’s figurative sculptures all live on the Navajo Reservation.

“They could be my grandmother, my neighbor or my friend,” he says. “Each face is different, and like each face, each piece of stone is different. That has always been my goal. I strive to create unique, one-of-a-kind pieces.”

Filed Under: Alvin Marshall